Home Japan Jishin-yoi: the feeling of earthquake drunkenness

Jishin-yoi: the feeling of earthquake drunkenness

by J. C. Greenway
6 comments
The Teas That Bind
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A short extract of a post that features in my book about the Great East Japan Earthquake, The Teas That Bind:

It usually starts with a jolt. If walking or standing, I notice the ground beneath my feet start to move, or if sitting I feel it along my spine. I brace myself for what is coming, look up at the light switch to see if it is moving…

… but nothing.

Check Twitter but there are no messages saying ‘quake!’ or, as we have got used to them and levity has crept in, ‘first!’ No reports from the Meteorological Agency announce an aftershock has been recorded. If there are other people around, my friends or students or coworkers, they do not seem to have noticed anything amiss. I shrug my shoulders, try to escape the sense of unease and get back to whatever it was I was doing. It must have been what I have started to think of as another ‘ghost aftershock.’

 

To read more of this post, please download a copy of The Teas That Bind, the story of my experiences in Japan after the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, available now from Amazon and Lulu.


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6 comments

Caroline Josephine 2 June 2011 - 11:49 pm

I get this when I’m laying down waiting for sleep. I always check in the morning to see if there were any quakes around 1-2am (when I go to bed) and usually… nothing. I can’t even imagine what it would be like in the north. Those poor people.

Reply
Joanne Greenway 5 June 2011 - 10:34 pm

That sounds bad, hope it isn’t disturbing your sleep too much!
I get it the worst when I’m walking down stairs. And the feeling is just like the kind of dizzy spell you would get if you stood at the top of a flight of stairs, in a long skirt and heels, with nothing to hang onto. It’s grim.

But yes, nowhere near as bad as it must be for the survivors in Tohoku.

Reply
Jeanne Driscoll 11 June 2011 - 2:28 am

This is an urgent matter I must relay to you about “Earthquake” hangover and I have evidence to prove it to you with the links, I’m providing to you. Mal de Debarqument syndrome is Earthquake Hangover and it’s all related to Motion Related Issue’s and probably Stress. Please watch this video and read links I have provided to you.

This is an urgent medical issue for you to understand so you can try to treat The Good People of Japan that are suffering with this life altering Mal de Deqarquement Syndrome of (MdDS). We need International Attention on Mal de Debarquement Syndrome because it is not as rare as doctors suspect because of the lack of knowledge to this Syndrome.

Please take this seriously because Earthquake Hangover Mimic’s Mal de Debarqment Syndome (MdDS)

Mal De Debarquement Syndrome a rare & life altering disorder! It’s more common then people think it is. This usually goes undiagnosed because the lack of education to Dr.’s. This syndrome mimic’s exactly Earthquake Hangover in Japan.

http://www.mddsfoundation.org/mdds_complete_symptom

http://blogs.wsj.com/japanrealtime/2011/04/14/how-t…/
http://abcnews.go.com/video/playerIndex?id=4180415
http://www.mddsfoundation.org/professionals/profess

Reply
Jeanne Driscoll 11 June 2011 - 2:35 am

Jishin-Yoi/Earthquake Hangover = Mimic’s Jishin-Yoi
Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS) or disembarkment syndrome is a rare disorder of perceived movement that most often develops following an ocean cruise, other type of water travel, or motion experience including plane flights and train travel. For a few, there is no known motion event; the onset appears to be spontaneous. MdDS persists for months to years.

Common symptoms include a persistent sensation of motion such as rocking, swaying, tumbling, and/or bobbing. This sensation of motion is often associated with anxiety, fatigue, difficulty maintaining balance, unsteadiness, and difficulty concentrating (impaired cognitive function). Often, the motion sensation seems to disappear when riding in the car or participating in other motion experiences.

Reply
Jeanne Driscoll 11 June 2011 - 2:48 am

Jishin-Yoi/Earthquake Hangover Mimic’s the Exact Same Symptoms of Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS) Proof with links below
Jishin-Yoi/Earthquake Hangover Mimic’s Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS) Proof with Information Provided Below With Links.

Mal de Debarquement Syndrome

Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (or MdDS) is an imbalance or rocking/swaying sensation often both “felt” and “seen” by the sufferer that occurs after exposure to motion (most commonly after a sea cruise or a flight). Although other forms of travel have been known to trigger it.

After alighting or “debarking” (debarquement) the traveller continues to feel “all at sea”, unable to get their land legs back. Although most travellers can identify with this feeling and do actually experience it temporarily after disembarking, unfortunately in the case of MdDS sufferers it can persist for many weeks, months, even years afterwards.

The symptoms are with you constantly, they never leave, nor can they be alleviated by any anti-motion sickness drugs (eg Stemetil, Serc etc)
“Like trying to constantly walk on a mattress or trampoline”

is a good description of the main symptom, which is usually most pronounced when the patient is sitting still; in fact, the sensations are usually minimized by actual motion, for example driving

http://www.mdds.org.uk/

http://www.mdds.org.uk/symptoms.phtml

Reply
Jeanne Driscoll 11 June 2011 - 3:26 am

please read this this is very important information
Jishin-Yoi/Earthquake Hangover Mimic’s the Exact Same Symptoms of Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS) Proof with links below
Jishin-Yoi/Earthquake Hangover Mimic’s Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (MdDS) Proof with Information Provided Below With Links.

Mal de Debarquement Syndrome

Mal de Debarquement Syndrome (or MdDS) is an imbalance or rocking/swaying sensation often both “felt” and “seen” by the sufferer that occurs after exposure to motion (most commonly after a sea cruise or a flight). Although other forms of travel have been known to trigger it.

After alighting or “debarking” (debarquement) the traveller continues to feel “all at sea”, unable to get their land legs back. Although most travellers can identify with this feeling and do actually experience it temporarily after disembarking, unfortunately in the case of MdDS sufferers it can persist for many weeks, months, even years afterwards.

The symptoms are with you constantly, they never leave, nor can they be alleviated by any anti-motion sickness drugs (eg Stemetil, Serc etc)
“Like trying to constantly walk on a mattress or trampoline”

is a good description of the main symptom, which is usually most pronounced when the patient is sitting still; in fact, the sensations are usually minimized by actual motion, for example driving

http://www.mdds.org.uk/

http://www.mdds.org.uk/symptoms.phtml

Reply

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